Psoriasis is becoming a pandemic

image

It is estimated that about 2.2 percent of American adults have been diagnosed with psoriasis, confirming that psoriasis is a common disease (1). 11 percent of those diagnosed with psoriasis have also been diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. This is a prevalence of 0.25 percent of American adults in the general population. Psoriasis prevalence in African Americans was 1.3 percent compared to 2.5 percent of Caucasians. The prevalence of psoriasis in Western populations is estimated to be around 2-3%. It affects both sexes equally and occurs at all ages.

 

Plaque Psoriasis

About 80% of people living with psoriasis have plaque psoriasis, which also is called “Psoriasis Vulgaris.” “Vulgaris” means “common” (2, 3).

 

How to recognize Plaque Psoriasis:1

  1. Raised and thickened patches of reddish skin called “plaques,” which are covered by silvery-white scales.

2. Plaques most often appear on the elbows, knees, scalp, chest, and lower back. However, they can appear anywhere on the body, including the genitals.

  1. Plaques vary in size and can appear as distinct patches or join together to cover a large area.

 

In the early stages, psoriasis may be unnoticeable. The skin may itch and/or a burning sensation may be present. Plaque psoriasis usually first appears as small red bumps. Bumps gradually enlarge, and scales form. While the top scales flake off easily and often, scales below the surface stick together. The small red bumps develop into plaques (reddish areas of raised and thickened skin).

 

And What Causes Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a complex and multifaceted auto-immune disease. In other words, multiple factors can potentially cause the development of this skin condition. For example, we have seen chlorine, mercury fillings, and parasite infestation being a trigger of psoriasis.

In addition, several factors are thought to aggravate psoriasis. These include stress and excessive alcohol consumption. Individuals with psoriasis may also suffer from depression and loss of self-esteem. As such, quality of life is an important factor in evaluating the severity of the disease.

 

  1. https://www.psoriasis.org/
  2. http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/psoriasis/understanding-psoriasis-basics#1
  3. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/psoriasis/home/ovc-20317577
Dr. Serge Gregoire
Dr. Serge is a clinical nutritionist. He owns a doctorate degree in nutrition from McGill University in Canada. In addition, he completed a 7-year postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts where he studied the impact of fat as it relates to heart disease.

He has authored a book on this topic that is awaiting publication with Edition Berger publishers in Canada. He holds an advance certification in Nutrition Response Testing (SM) from Ulan Nutritional Systems in Florida and he is a certified herbalist through the Australian College of Phytotherapy.

His personalized nutritional programs allow to help individuals with a wide variety of health concerns such as hormonal imbalance, digestive issues, heart-related conditions, detoxes/cleanses, weight loss, fatigue, migraines, allergies, among others.

  • Xmen442002

    Diet and lifestyle changes will help control this. I suffer from eczema and keep it at bay with better nutritional choices. Also known as “Functional Medicine”.

  • Silverbug

    Try taking an enzyme. Most are deficient. It will help breakdown carbs, proteins, etc that are acidic in nature and cause Leaky gut which leads to skin problems.